Finally, Progress!

My fig ferment was starting to smell, well, awful. Like vinegar. I wasn’t too surprised, and was pretty sure all was not lost – just needed to remove the likely-too-ripe figs. So, last night I strained the fruit pulp (probably should have done it one night earlier). I covered with a cloth rather than a solid lid, tied around the mouth of the jar. I woke this morning to spontaneous bubbling. That’s a first for me in this series of fermentation experiments!

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The color has definitely changed since straining and leaving overnight, from an orange-ish pink to a deep, earthy yellow. And rather than a vinegar-like odor, it smells like bread. I imagine that’s the yeast. In any case, going to give it some more time and see what develops.

Actually, when I first woke up, there was about a half inch layer of viscous bubbly material that was quite a sight to see. Wish I had had my phone with me at the time. I shook it up to reincorporate the oxygenated yeast and solids into the solution and haven’t seen the thick layer form again, yet. It’s actually a little difficult to see the bubbles forming. But if you use your sense of hearing instead of sight, it is clear from the quick-popping, light chatter that CO2 is being produced.

Oh – last night I also moved my two honey experiments into mason jars with wide mouths, which will make it easier to stir. Based on the success of my well-stirred figs, I think my air-locking of the honey ferments, with only shaking but no added oxygen (which apparently helps with yeast reproduction!), may be responsible for the ill progress. However, this morning I have seen little to suggest any forward motion. I’ll give it a couple days.

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About George

I'm interested in theology, languages, translation and various sorts of fermentation.
This entry was posted in Fermentation, Mead, Wine and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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