Pickled Cherry Tomatoes

There’s a lot of recipes out there for pickled cherry tomatoes, although most are the quick variety adding vinegar, rather than fermented. And I definitely am shooting for fermented! Of all the recipes I saw, I saw various spices or additions. I also saw different salt to water ratios. So I can’t really say I am following any specific recipe, more just following some general principles.

One of the flavoring systems was a Thai spice mixture, and while intrigued, I am passing on that for now. I am looking more for just the savory sensations of peppercorn, basil and rosemary – so that is what I am going with. And, except for the peppercorns, those are herbs in my garden. That is all the better, in my mind.

My Recipe - Pickled Cherry Tomatoes

My Recipe – Pickled Cherry Tomatoes

My Recipe

I actually have both cherry tomatoes and some Yellow Pear Standard tomatoes, both up to now doing quite well in the garden. I had enough for a quart of each (or just shy, I suppose). We get more daily, though I think the vine for the Yellow Pear Standard is not doing as well. In any case, it only took a couple of days to build up enough for these quarts.

I made up a brine of 1 quart of purified water and about 2.5 Tbsp. of pickling salt. That ratio is a little bit more than my most recent pickles, but not as much as I saw in many other recipes for cherry tomato pickling. After mixing thoroughly, I then set it aside.

I added 6 peppercorns in each of two quart jars. I then filled each jar a third full with its respective tomatoes. Then I added two basil leaves to each, then another third of the jar I filled with tomatoes. Then, I added a short sprig of rosemary to each, followed by the remainder of the tomatoes.

Then, it was time to add the brine, which was easy enough. I then used half-pint jars to weigh down the fruit. There was just a little bit of the brine left, and this I placed in the half-pint jars as extra weight. Then, I rubber banded a wash-rag over each jar combo to keep critters off.

General consensus seems to be around 5 days of fermentation, then cool storage, just as with the pickled squash.

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Oops

What I forgot, until just a bit ago, was to use a toothpick to poke a hole in the tomatoes. This was suggested by almost all recipes I saw, to allow the fermentation to penetrate into the tomatoes better. So I washed up as much as possible, and one at a time emptied each jar into a large measuring  bowl, then skewered each tomato, trying to duplicate the placement of the herbs. What I could not do was get the peppercorns back at bottom.

Otherwise, everything ended back in the jars successfully, with a little bit of mess in the transfer of liquids.

As always, now we wait.

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About George

I'm interested in theology, languages, translation and various sorts of fermentation.
This entry was posted in Fermentation Log, Fruits and Vegetables, Pickling and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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